Reference: Elliott B, et al. (1996) Synergy between trehalose and Hsp104 for thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics 144(3):923-33

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Abstract

We isolated a mutant strain unable to acquire heat shock resistance in stationary phase. Two mutations contributed to this phenotype. One mutation was at the TPS2 locus, which encodes trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase. The mutant fails to make trehalose and accumulates trehalose-6-phosphate. The other mutation was at the HSP104 locus. Gene disruptions showed that tps2 and hsp104 null mutants each produced moderate heat shock sensitivity in stationary phase cells. The two mutations were synergistic and the double mutant had little or no stationary phase-induced heat shock resistance. The same effect was seen in the tps1 (trehalose-6-phosphate synthase) hsp104 double mutant, suggesting that the extreme heat shock sensitivity was due mainly to a lack of trehalose rather than to the presence of trehalose-6-phosphate. However, accumulation of trehalose-6-phosphate did cause some phenotypes in the tps2 mutant, such as temperature sensitivity for growth. Finally, we isolated a high copy number suppressor of the temperature sensitivity of tps2, which we call PMU1, which reduced the levels of trehalose-6-phosphate in tps2 mutants. The encoded protein has a region homologous to the active site of phosphomutases.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Elliott B, Haltiwanger RS, Futcher B
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