Take our Survey

Reference: Trueblood CE, et al. (1993) Genetic evidence for in vivo cross-specificity of the CaaX-box protein prenyltransferases farnesyltransferase and geranylgeranyltransferase-I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mol Cell Biol 13(7):4260-75

Reference Help

Abstract


Two protein prenyltransferase enzymes, farnesyltransferase (FTase) and geranylgeranyltransferase-I (GGTase-I), catalyze the covalent attachment of a farnesyl or geranylgeranyl lipid group to the cysteine of a CaaX sequence (cysteine [C], two aliphatic amino acids [aa], and any amino acid [X]. In vitro studies reported here confirm previous reports that CaaX proteins with a C-terminal serine are farnesylated by FTase and those with a C-terminal leucine are geranylgeranylated by GGTase-I. In addition, we found that FTase can farnesylate CaaX proteins with a C-terminal leucine and can transfer a geranylgeranyl group to some CaaX proteins. Genetic data indicate that FTase and GGTase-I have the same substrate preferences in vivo as in vitro and also show that each enzyme can prenylate some of the preferred substrates of the other enzyme in vivo. Specifically, the viability of yeast cells lacking FTase is due to prenylation of Ras proteins by GGTase-I. Although this GGTase-I dependent prenylation of Ras is sufficient for growth, it is not sufficient for mutationally activated Ras proteins to exert deleterious effects on growth. The dependence of the activated Ras phenotype on FTase can be bypassed by replacing the C-terminal serine with leucine. This altered form of Ras appears to be prenylated by both GGTase-I and FTase, since it produces an activated phenotype in a strain lacking either FTase or GGTase-I. Yeast cells can grow in the absence of GGTase-I as long as two essential substrates are overexpressed, but their growth is slow. Such strains are dependent on FTase for viability and are able to grow faster when FTase is overproduced, suggesting that FTase can prenylate the essential substrates of GGTase-I when they are overproduced.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Trueblood CE, Ohya Y, Rine J
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference