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Reference: Alver B, et al. (2013) Novel checkpoint pathway organization promotes genome stability in stationary-phase yeast cells. Mol Cell Biol 33(2):457-72

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Abstract

Most DNA alterations occur during DNA replication in the S phase of the cell cycle. However, the majority of eukaryotic cells exist in a nondividing, quiescent state. Little is known about the factors involved in preventing DNA instability within this stationary-phase cell population. Previously, we utilized a unique assay system to identify mutations that increased minisatellite alterations specifically in quiescent cells in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we conducted a modified version of synthetic genetic array analysis to determine if checkpoint signaling components play a role in stabilizing minisatellites in stationary-phase yeast cells. Our results revealed that a subset of checkpoint components, specifically MRC1, CSM3, TOF1, DDC1, RAD17, MEC3, TEL1, MEC1, and RAD53, prevent stationary-phase minisatellite alterations within the quiescent cell subpopulation of stationary-phase cells. Pathway analysis revealed at least three pathways, with MRC1, CSM3, and TOF1 acting in a pathway independent of MEC1 and RAD53. Overall, our data indicate that some well-characterized checkpoint components maintain minisatellite stability in stationary-phase cells but are regulated differently in those cells than in actively growing cells. For the MRC1-dependent pathway, the checkpoint itself may not be the important element; rather, it may be loss of the checkpoint proteins' other functions that contributes to DNA instability.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Alver B, Kelly MK, Kirkpatrick DT
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