Take our Survey

Reference: Zeng T and Chen L (2012) Tracing dynamic biological processes during phase transition. BMC Syst Biol 6 Suppl 1:S12

Reference Help

Abstract


BACKGROUND: Phase transition widely exists in the biological world, such as transformation of cell cycle phases, cell differentiation stages, disease development, and so on. Such a nonlinear phenomenon is considered as the conversion of a biological system from one phenotype/state to another. Studies on the molecular mechanisms of biological phase transition have attracted much attention, in particular, on different genotypes (or expression variations) in a specific phase, but with less of focus on cascade changes of genes' functions (or system state) during the phase shift or transition process. However, it is a fundamental but important mission to trace the temporal characteristics of a biological system during a specific phase transition process, which can offer clues for understanding dynamic behaviors of living organisms. RESULTS: By overcoming the hurdles of traditional time segmentation and temporal biclustering methods, a causal process model (CPM) in the present work is proposed to study the biological phase transition in a systematic manner, i.e. first, we make gene-specific segmentation on time-course expression data by developing a new boundary gene estimation scheme, and then infer functional cascade dynamics by constructing a temporal block network. After the computational validation on synthetic data, CPM was used to analyze the well-known Yeast cell cycle data. It was found that the dynamics of the boundary genes are periodic and consistent with the phases of the cell cycle, and the temporal block network indeed demonstrates a meaningful cascade structure of the enriched biological functions. In addition, we further studied protein modules based on the temporal block network, which reflect temporal features in different cycles. CONCLUSIONS: All of these results demonstrate that CPM is effective and efficient comparing to traditional methods, and is able to elucidate essential regulatory mechanism of a biological system even with complicated nonlinear phase transitions.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Zeng T, Chen L
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference