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Reference: Uddin G, et al. (2012) Pistagremic acid, a glucosidase inhibitor from Pistacia integerrima. Fitoterapia 83(8):1648-52

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Abstract


Pistacia integerrima Stewart in traditionally used as folk remedy for various pathological conditions including diabetes. In order to identify the bioactive compound responsible for its folk use in diabetes, a phytochemical and biological study was conducted. Pistagremic acid (PA) was isolated from the dried galls extract of P. integerrima. Strong a-glucosidase inhibitory potential of PA was predicted using its molecular docking simulations against yeast a-glucosidase as a therapeutic target. Significant experimental a-glucosidase inhibitory activity of PA confirmed the computational predictions. PA showed potent enzyme inhibitory activity both against yeast (IC(50): 89.12?0.12?M) and rat intestinal (IC(50): 62.47?0.09?M) a-glucosidases. Interestingly, acarbose was found to be more than 12 times more potent an inhibitor against mammalian (rat intestinal) enzyme (having IC(50) value 62.47?0.09?M), as compared to the microbial (yeast) enzyme (with IC(50) value 780.21?M). Molecular binding mode was explored via molecular docking simulations, which revealed hydrogen bonding interactions between PA and important amino acid residues (Asp60, Arg69 and Asp 70 (3.11?)), surrounding the catalytic site of the a-glucosidase. These interactions could be mainly responsible for their role in potent inhibitory activity of PA. PA has a strong potential to be further investigated as a new lead compound for better management of diabetes.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Uddin G, Rauf A, Al-Othman AM, Collina S, Arfan M, Ali G, Khan I
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