Reference: Sun X, et al. (2013) An improved implementation of effective number of codons (nc). Mol Biol Evol 30(1):191-6

Reference Help

Abstract

The effective number of codons (N(c)) is a widely used index for characterizing codon usage bias because it does not require a set of reference genes as does codon adaptation index (CAI) and because of the freely available computational tools such as CodonW. However, N(c), as originally formulated has many problems. For example, it can have values far greater than the number of sense codons; it treats a 6-fold compound codon family as a single-codon family although it is made of a 2-fold and a 4-fold codon family that can be under dramatically different selection for codon usage bias; the existing implementations do not handle all different genetic codes; it is often biased by codon families with a small number of codons. We developed a new N(c) that has a number of advantages over the original N(c). Its maximum value equals the number of sense codons when all synonymous codons are used equally, and its minimum value equals the number of codon families when exactly one codon is used in each synonymous codon family. It handles all known genetic codes. It breaks the compound codon families (e.g., those involving amino acids coded by six synonymous codons) into 2-fold and 4-fold codon families. It reduces the effect of codon families with few codons by introducing pseudocount and weighted averages. The new N(c) has significantly improved correlation with CAI than the original N(c) from CodonW based on protein-coding genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, and Mycoplasma genitalium. It also correlates better with protein abundance data from the yeast than the original N(c).

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Sun X, Yang Q, Xia X
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference