Take our Survey

Reference: Celton M, et al. (2012) A constraint-based model analysis of the metabolic consequences of increased NADPH oxidation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Metab Eng 14(4):366-79

Reference Help

Abstract

Controlling the amounts of redox cofactors to manipulate metabolic fluxes is emerging as a useful approach to optimizing byproduct yields in yeast biotechnological processes. Redox cofactors are extensively interconnected metabolites, so predicting metabolite patterns is challenging and requires in-depth knowledge of how the metabolic network responds to a redox perturbation. Our aim was to analyze comprehensively the metabolic consequences of increased cytosolic NADPH oxidation during yeast fermentation. Using a genetic device based on the overexpression of a modified 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase catalyzing the NADPH-dependent reduction of acetoin into 2,3-butanediol, we increased the NADPH demand to between 8 and 40-fold the anabolic demand. We developed (i) a dedicated constraint-based model of yeast fermentation and (ii) a constraint-based modeling method based on the dynamical analysis of mass distribution to quantify the in vivo contribution of pathways producing NADPH to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. We report that yeast responds to NADPH oxidation through a gradual increase in the flux through the PP and acetate pathways, providing 80% and 20% of the NADPH demand, respectively. However, for the highest NADPH demand, the model reveals a saturation of the PP pathway and predicts an exchange between NADH and NADPH in the cytosol that may be mediated by the glycerol-DHA futile cycle. We also reveal the contribution of mitochondrial shuttles, resulting in a net production of NADH in the cytosol, to fine-tune the NADH/NAD(+) balance. This systems level study helps elucidate the physiological adaptation of yeast to NADPH perturbation. Our findings emphasize the robustness of yeast to alterations in NADPH metabolism and highlight the role of the glycerol-DHA cycle as a redox valve, providing additional NADPH from NADH under conditions of very high demand.CI - Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Celton M, Goelzer A, Camarasa C, Fromion V, Dequin S
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference