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Reference: Park Y and Bader JS (2012) How networks change with time. Bioinformatics 28(12):i40-i48

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Abstract

MOTIVATION: Biological networks change in response to genetic and environmental cues. Changes are reflected in the abundances of biomolecules, the composition of protein complexes and other descriptors of the biological state. Methods to infer the dynamic state of a cell would have great value for understanding how cells change over time to accomplish biological goals. RESULTS: A new method predicts the dynamic state of protein complexes in a cell, with protein expression inferred from transcription profile time courses and protein complexes inferred by joint analysis of protein co-expression and protein-protein interaction maps. Two algorithmic advances are presented: a new method, DHAC (Dynamical Hierarchical Agglomerative Clustering), for clustering time-evolving networks; and a companion method, MATCH-EM, for matching corresponding clusters across time points. With link prediction as an objective assessment metric, DHAC provides a substantial advance over existing clustering methods. An application to the yeast metabolic cycle demonstrates how waves of gene expression correspond to individual protein complexes. Our results suggest regulatory mechanisms for assembling the mitochondrial ribosome and illustrate dynamic changes in the components of the nuclear pore. AVAILABILITY: All source code and data are available under the Boost Software License as supplementary material, at www.baderzone.org, and at sourceforge.net/projects/dhacdist CONTACT: joel.bader@jhu.edu SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

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Journal Article
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Park Y, Bader JS
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