Reference: Connelly CF and Akey JM (2012) On the prospects of whole-genome association mapping in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics 191(4):1345-53

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Abstract

Advances in sequencing technology have enabled whole-genome sequences to be obtained from multiple individuals within species, particularly in model organisms with compact genomes. For example, 36 genome sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are now publicly available, and SNP data are available for even larger collections of strains. One potential use of these resources is mapping the genetic basis of phenotypic variation through genome-wide association (GWA) studies, with the benefit that associated variants can be studied experimentally with greater ease than in outbred populations such as humans. Here, we evaluate the prospects of GWA studies in S. cerevisiae strains through extensive simulations and a GWA study of mitochondrial copy number. We demonstrate that the complex and heterogeneous patterns of population structure present in yeast populations can lead to a high type I error rate in GWA studies of quantitative traits, and that methods typically used to control for population stratification do not provide adequate control of the type I error rate. Moreover, we show that while GWA studies of quantitative traits in S. cerevisiae may be difficult depending on the particular set of strains studied, association studies to map cis-acting quantitative trait loci (QTL) and Mendelian phenotypes are more feasible. We also discuss sampling strategies that could enable GWA studies in yeast and illustrate the utility of this approach in Saccharomyces paradoxus. Thus, our results provide important practical insights into the design and interpretation of GWA studies in yeast, and other model organisms that possess complex patterns of population structure.

Reference Type
Journal Article
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Connelly CF, Akey JM
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