Reference: Dion V, et al. (2012) Increased mobility of double-strand breaks requires Mec1, Rad9 and the homologous recombination machinery.LID - 10.1038/ncb2465 [doi] Nat Cell Biol

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Abstract

Chromatin mobility is thought to facilitate homology search during homologous recombination and to shift damage either towards or away from specialized repair compartments. However, unconstrained mobility of double-strand breaks could also promote deleterious chromosomal translocations. Here we use live time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to track the mobility of damaged DNA in budding yeast. We found that a Rad52-YFP focus formed at an irreparable double-strand break moves in a larger subnuclear volume than the undamaged locus. In contrast, Rad52-YFP bound at damage arising from a protein-DNA adduct shows no increase in movement. Mutant analysis shows that enhanced double-strand-break mobility requires Rad51, the ATPase activity of Rad54, the ATR homologue Mec1 and the DNA-damage-response mediator Rad9. Consistent with a role for movement in the homology-search step of homologous recombination, we show that recombination intermediates take longer to form in cells lacking Rad9.

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Journal Article
Authors
Dion V, Kalck V, Horigome C, Towbin BD, Gasser SM
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