Reference: Zhang L, et al. (2011) Meiotic double-strand breaks occur once per pair of (sister) chromatids and, via Mec1/ATR and Tel1/ATM, once per quartet of chromatids. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108(50):20036-41

Reference Help

Abstract


Meiotic recombination initiates via programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). We investigate whether, at a given initiation site, DSBs occur independently among the four available chromatids. For a single DSB "hot spot", the proportions of nuclei exhibiting zero, one, or two (or more) observable events were defined by tetrad analysis and compared with those predicted by different DSB distribution scenarios. Wild-type patterns are incompatible with independent distribution of DSBs among the four chromatids. In most or all nuclei, DSBs occur one-per-pair of chromatids, presumptively sisters. In many nuclei, only one DSB occurs per four chromatids, confirming the existence of trans inhibition where a DSB on one chromosome interactively inhibits DSB formation on the partner chromosome. Several mutants exhibit only a one-per-pair constraint, a phenotype we propose to imply loss of trans inhibition. Signal transduction kinases Mec1 (ATR) and Tel1 (ATM) exhibit this phenotype and thus could be mediators of this effect. Spreading trans inhibition can explain even spacing of total recombinational interactions and implies that establishment of interhomolog interactions and DSB formation are homeostatic processes. The two types of constraints on DSB formation provide two different safeguards against recombination failure during meiosis.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Authors
Zhang L, Kleckner NE, Storlazzi A, Kim KP
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference