Take our Survey

Reference: Yeung M and Durocher D (2011) Srs2 enables checkpoint recovery by promoting disassembly of DNA damage foci from chromatin. DNA Repair (Amst) 10(12):1213-22

Reference Help

Abstract

Following DNA repair, checkpoint signalling must be abated to resume cell cycling in a phenomenon known as checkpoint recovery. Although a number of genes have been implicated in the recovery process, it is still unknown whether checkpoint recovery is caused by a signalling network activated by DNA repair or whether it is the result of the loss of DNA structures that elicit the checkpoint. Here we show that checkpoint recovery can be uncoupled from bulk chromosome DNA repair if single-stranded (ss) DNA persists. This situation occurs in cells that are deficient in the Srs2 helicase, a protein that antagonizes Rad51. We report that srs2Delta cells fail to eliminate Ddc2 and RPA subnuclear foci following bulk chromosome repair due to the persistence of ssDNA. In contrast to cells with DNA double-strand breaks that remain unrepaired, srs2Delta cells remove the 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp from chromatin after repair. However, despite the loss of the 9-1-1 clamp, Dpb11 remains associated with chromatin to promote checkpoint activity. Our work indicates that Srs2 promotes checkpoint recovery by removing Rad51 after DNA repair. A failure to remove Rad51 causes persistence of ssDNA and the checkpoint signal. Therefore, we conclude that cells initiate recovery when the DNA structures that elicit the checkpoint are eliminated.CI - 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Yeung M, Durocher D
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference