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Reference: Hsu WS, et al. (2011) S-phase cyclin-dependent kinases promote sister chromatid cohesion in budding yeast. Mol Cell Biol 31(12):2470-83

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Abstract


Genome stability depends on faithful chromosome segregation, which relies on maintenance of chromatid cohesion during S phase. In eukaryotes, Pds1/securin is the only known inhibitor that can prevent loss of cohesion. However, pds1? yeast cells and securin-null mice are viable. We sought to identify redundant mechanisms that promote cohesion within S phase in the absence of Pds1 and found that cells lacking the S-phase cyclins Clb5 and Clb6 have a cohesion defect under conditions of replication stress. Similar to the phenotype of pds1? cells, loss of cohesion in cells lacking Clb5 and Clb6 is dependent on Esp1. However, Pds1 phosphorylation by Cdk-cyclin is not required for cohesion. Moreover, cells lacking Clb5, Clb6, and Pds1 are inviable and lose cohesion during an unperturbed S phase, indicating that Pds1 and specific B-type cyclins promote cohesion independently of one another. Consistent with this, we find that Mcd1/Scc1 is less abundant on chromosomes in cells lacking Clb5 and Clb6 during replication stress. However, clb5? clb6? cells do accumulate Mcd1/Scc1 at centromeres upon mitotic arrest, suggesting that the cyclin-dependent mechanism is S phase specific. These data indicate that Clb5 and Clb6 promote cohesion which is then protected by Pds1 and that both mechanisms are required during replication stress.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Authors
Hsu WS, Erickson SL, Tsai HJ, Andrews CA, Vas AC, Clarke DJ
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