Reference: Meyer B, et al. (2011) 100% protein sequence coverage: a modern form of surrealism in proteomics. Amino Acids 41(2):291-310

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Abstract


This review intends not only to discuss the current possibilities to gain 100% sequence coverage for proteins, but also to point out the critical limits to such an attempt. The aim of 100% sequence coverage, as the review title already implies, seems to be rather surreal if the complexity and dynamic range of a proteome is taken into consideration. Nevertheless, established bottom-up shotgun approaches are able to roughly identify a complete proteome as exemplary shown by yeast. However, this proceeding ignores more or less the fact that a protein is present as various protein species. The unambiguous identification of protein species requires 100% sequence coverage. Furthermore, the separation of the proteome must be performed on the protein species and not on the peptide level. Therefore, top-down is a good strategy for protein species analysis. Classical 2D-electrophoresis followed by an enzymatic or chemical cleavage, which is a combination of top-down and bottom-up, is another interesting approach. Moreover, the review summarizes further top-down and bottom-up combinations and to which extent middle-down improves the identification of protein species. The attention is also focused on cleavage strategies other than trypsin, as 100% sequence coverage in bottom-up experiments is only obtainable with a combination of cleavage reagents.

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Journal Article
Authors
Meyer B, Papasotiriou DG, Karas M
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