Take our Survey

Reference: Nick McElhinny SA, et al. (2010) Abundant ribonucleotide incorporation into DNA by yeast replicative polymerases. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107(11):4949-54

Reference Help

Abstract

Measurements of nucleoside triphosphate levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveal that the four rNTPs are in 36- to 190-fold molar excess over their corresponding dNTPs. During DNA synthesis in vitro using the physiological nucleoside triphosphate concentrations, yeast DNA polymerase epsilon, which is implicated in leading strand replication, incorporates one rNMP for every 1,250 dNMPs. Pol delta and Pol alpha, which conduct lagging strand replication, incorporate one rNMP for every 5,000 or 625 dNMPs, respectively. Discrimination against rNMP incorporation varies widely, in some cases by more than 100-fold, depending on the identity of the base and the template sequence context in which it is located. Given estimates of the amount of replication catalyzed by Pols alpha, delta, and epsilon, the results are consistent with the possibility that more than 10,000 rNMPs may be incorporated into the nuclear genome during each round of replication in yeast. Thus, rNMPs may be the most common noncanonical nucleotides introduced into the eukaryotic genome. Potential beneficial and negative consequences of abundant ribonucleotide incorporation into DNA are discussed, including the possibility that unrepaired rNMPs in DNA could be problematic because yeast DNA polymerase epsilon has difficulty bypassing a single rNMP present within a DNA template.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Nick McElhinny SA, Watts BE, Kumar D, Watt DL, Lundstrom EB, Burgers PM, Johansson E, Chabes A, Kunkel TA
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference