Reference: Helbig AO, et al. (2010) Profiling of N-acetylated protein termini provides in-depth insights into the N-terminal nature of the proteome. Mol Cell Proteomics 9(5):928-39

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Abstract

N-terminal processing of proteins is a process affecting a large part of the eukaryotic proteome. Although N-terminal processing is an essential process, not many large inventories are available, in particular not for human proteins. Here we show that by using dedicated mass spectrometry based proteomics techniques it is possible to unravel N-terminal processing in a semi-comprehensive way. Our multi protease approach leads to the identification of 1391 acetylated human protein N-termini in HEK293 cells and revealed that the role of the penultimate position on the cleavage efficiency by the methionine aminopeptidases is essentially conserved from E. coli to human. Sequence analysis and comparisons of amino acid frequencies in the datasets of experimentally derived N-acetylated peptides from D. melanogaster, S. cerevisiae and H. salinarum showed an exceptionally higher frequency of alanine residues at the penultimate position of human proteins, whereas the penultimate position in S. cerevisiae and H. salinarum is predominantly a serine. Genome wide comparisons revealed that this effect is not related to protein N-terminal processing but can be traced back to characteristics of the genome.

Reference Type
Journal Article
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Helbig AO, Gauci S, Raijmakers R, van Breukelen B, Slijper M, Mohammed S, Heck AJ
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