Reference: Pedrajas JR, et al. (2010) Glutaredoxin participates in the reduction of peroxides by the mitochondrial 1-CYS peroxiredoxin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Antioxid Redox Signal 13(3):249-58

Reference Help

Abstract

The mechanism for regeneration of the active site "peroxidatic" cysteine in 1-Cys peroxiredoxins is a matter of debate. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Prx1 is a mitochondrial enzyme belonging to the 1-Cys Prx while Grx2 is involved in antioxidant defense and localizes at the mitochondria, so we hypothesized that it could be a perfect candidate to resolve the sulfenate in Prx1 with GSH. In vitro experiments with purified Prx1p and Grx2p demonstrate that Grx2, at concentrations below 1 microM, coupled to GSH is a very efficient thiolic intermediary for the reduction of the peroxidatic Cys in Prx1. Prx1 forms oligomeric aggregates natively, but depolymerizes down to a dimeric sate upon treatment with GSH. The catalytic cycle involves glutathionylation of dimeric Prx1 and deglutathionylation by Grx2. Dihydrolipoamide, a genuine mitochondrial dithiol, can efficiently substitute for GSH. The activity is highest at alkaline pH consistent with the conditions of active respiring mitochondria and the process is highly specific for 1-Cys Prx since Grx2 is totally inactive with human PRX-I, a typical 2-Cys Prx as opposed to the promiscuity of Trx. Our results suggest that while Trx is the reductant involved in the reduction of peroxides by 2-Cys-Prx, Grx might be the natural resolving partner of 1-Cys Prx through a monothiolic mechanism.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Pedrajas JR, Padilla CA, McDonagh BN, Barcena JA
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference