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Reference: Vembar SS, et al. (2009) The Mammalian Hsp40 ERdj3 Requires Its Hsp70 Interaction and Substrate-binding Properties to Complement Various Yeast Hsp40-dependent Functions. J Biol Chem 284(47):32462-71

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Abstract

Heat shock proteins of 70kDa (Hsp70s) and their J domain-containing Hsp40 co-factors are highly conserved chaperone pairs that facilitate a large number of cellular processes. The observation that each Hsp70 partners with many J domain-containing proteins (JDPs) has led to the hypothesis that Hsp70 function is dictated by cognate JDPs. If this is true, one might expect highly divergent Hsp70-JDP pairs to be unable to function in vivo. However, we discovered that when a yeast cytosolic JDP, Ydj1, was targeted to the mammalian ER, it interacted with the ER-lumenal Hsp70, BiP, and bound to BiP substrates. Conversely, when a mammalian ER-lumenal JDP, ERdj3, was directed to the yeast cytosol, it rescued the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of yeast containing mutant alleles in two cytosolic JDPs, HLJ1 and YDJ1, and activated the ATP hydrolysis rate of Ssa1, the yeast cytosolic Hsp70 that partners with Hlj1 and Ydj1. ERdj3 mutants that were compromised for substrate binding were unable to rescue the hlj1ydj1 growth defect even though they stimulated the ATPase activity of Ssa1. Yet, J domain mutants of ERdj3 that were defective for interaction with Ssa1 restored the growth of hlj1ydj1 yeast. Taken together, these data suggest that the substrate binding properties of certain JDPs, not simply the formation of unique Hsp70-JDP pairs, are critical to specify in vivo function.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Vembar SS, Jin Y, Brodsky JL, Hendershot LM
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