Reference: Sperling AS and Grunstein M (2009) Histone H3 N-terminus regulates higher order structure of yeast heterochromatin. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106(32):13153-9

Reference Help

Abstract

In budding yeast, telomeres and the mating type (HM) loci are found in a heterochromatin-like silent structure initiated by Rap1 and extended by the interaction of Silencing Information Regulator (Sir) proteins with histones. Binding data demonstrate that both the H3 and H4 N-terminal domains required for silencing in vivo interact directly with Sir3 and Sir4 in vitro. The role of H4 lysine 16 deacetylation is well established in Sir3 protein recruitment; however, that of the H3 N-terminal tail has remained unclear. To characterize the role of H3 in silent chromatin formation and compare it to H4 we have generated comprehensive high resolution genome-wide binding maps of heterochromatin proteins. We found that H4 lysine 16 deacetylation is required for the recruitment and spreading of heterochromatin proteins at all telomeres and HM loci. In contrast, the H3 N terminus is required for neither recruitment nor spreading of Sir proteins. Instead, deletion of the H3 tail leads to increased accessibility within heterochromatin of an ectopic bacterial dam methylase and the decreased mobility of an HML heterochromatic fragment in sucrose gradients. These findings indicate an altered chromatin structure. We propose that Sir proteins recruited by the H4 tail then interact with the H3 tail to form a higher order silent chromatin structure.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Sperling AS, Grunstein M
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference