Reference: Horvath S and Dong J (2008) Geometric interpretation of gene coexpression network analysis. PLoS Comput Biol 4(8):e1000117

Reference Help

Abstract

THE MERGING OF NETWORK THEORY AND MICROARRAY DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES HAS SPAWNED A NEW FIELD: gene coexpression network analysis. While network methods are increasingly used in biology, the network vocabulary of computational biologists tends to be far more limited than that of, say, social network theorists. Here we review and propose several potentially useful network concepts. We take advantage of the relationship between network theory and the field of microarray data analysis to clarify the meaning of and the relationship among network concepts in gene coexpression networks. Network theory offers a wealth of intuitive concepts for describing the pairwise relationships among genes, which are depicted in cluster trees and heat maps. Conversely, microarray data analysis techniques (singular value decomposition, tests of differential expression) can also be used to address difficult problems in network theory. We describe conditions when a close relationship exists between network analysis and microarray data analysis techniques, and provide a rough dictionary for translating between the two fields. Using the angular interpretation of correlations, we provide a geometric interpretation of network theoretic concepts and derive unexpected relationships among them. We use the singular value decomposition of module expression data to characterize approximately factorizable gene coexpression networks, i.e., adjacency matrices that factor into node specific contributions. High and low level views of coexpression networks allow us to study the relationships among modules and among module genes, respectively. We characterize coexpression networks where hub genes are significant with respect to a microarray sample trait and show that the network concept of intramodular connectivity can be interpreted as a fuzzy measure of module membership. We illustrate our results using human, mouse, and yeast microarray gene expression data. The unification of coexpression network methods with traditional data mining methods can inform the application and development of systems biologic methods.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Horvath S, Dong J
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference