Reference: Langston LD and O'Donnell M (2008) DNA Polymerase {delta} Is Highly Processive with Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen and Undergoes Collision Release upon Completing DNA. J Biol Chem 283(43):29522-31

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Abstract


In most cells, 100-1000 Okazaki fragments are produced for each replicative DNA polymerase present in the cell. For fast-growing cells, this necessitates rapid recycling of DNA polymerase on the lagging strand. Bacteria produce long Okazaki fragments (1-2kb) and utilize a highly processive DNA polymerase III (Pol III), which is held to DNA by a circular sliding clamp. In contrast, Okazaki fragments in eukaryotes are quite short, 100-250 bp, and thus the eukaryotic lagging strand polymerase does not require a high degree of processivity. The lagging strand polymerase in eukaryotes, polymerase d (Pol d), functions with the PCNA sliding clamp. In this report, S. cerevisiae Pol d is examined on model substrates to gain insight into the mechanism of lagging strand replication in eukaryotes. Surprisingly, we find Pol d is highly processive with PCNA, over at least 5 kb, on RPA coated primed single-strand DNA. The high processivity of Pol d observed in this report contrasts with its role in synthesis of short lagging strand fragments, which require it to rapidly dissociate from DNA at the end of each Okazaki fragment. We find that this dilemma is solved by a "collision release" process in which Pol d ejects from PCNA upon extending a DNA template to completion and running into the downstream duplex. The released Pol d transfers to a new primed site, provided the new site contains a PCNA clamp. Additional results indicate that the collision release mechanism is intrinsic to the Pol3/Pol31 subunits of the Pol d heterotrimer.

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Journal Article
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Langston LD, O'Donnell M
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