Reference: Ellison KS, et al. (1991) A site-directed approach for constructing temperature-sensitive ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes reveals a cell cycle function and growth function for RAD6. J Biol Chem 266(35):24116-20

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Abstract


We have determined the gene sequence of a temperature-sensitive allele of the cell cycle-related ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme CDC34 (UBC 3) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The basis of temperature sensitivity is a missense mutation resulting in a proline to serine substitution at a residue that is conserved in all ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes identified thus far. This observation raised the possibility that other temperature-sensitive ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes could be generated in the same way. We therefore created the corresponding substitution in the DNA repair-related ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, RAD6 (UBC2), and examined the effect of temperature on the cell proliferation and DNA repair-related functions of this altered polypeptide. Yeast strains carrying this mutation proved to be temperature-sensitive with respect to cell proliferation but not with respect to the DNA damage-processing phenotypes exhibited by other rad6 mutants. Upon further investigation of the proliferation defect exhibited by this mutant, we discovered that other rad6 gene mutants deleted for the gene undergo cell cycle arrest at the nonpermissive temperature, whereas the engineered temperature-sensitive allele showed no evidence of a cell cycle defect. From these findings, we conclude that the proliferation function of RAD6 can be subdivided into a growth component and a cell division cycle component and that the growth component is unrelated to the DNA repair functions of RAD6. A reasonable interpretation of these results is that different proteins are targeted for ubiquitination in each case. The conserved proline residue of RAD6 and CDC34 is part of a turn motif common to all ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. It is therefore likely that site-directed substitution of prolines located in turns can be generally applied for the creation of other temperature-sensitive ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes and possibly other proteins as well.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Comparative Study
Authors
Ellison KS, Gwozd T, Prendergast JA, Paterson MC, Ellison MJ
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