Reference: Mazon MJ, et al. (2007) Efficient degradation of misfolded mutant Pma1 by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation requires Atg19 and the Cvt/autophagy pathway. Mol Microbiol 63(4):1069-1077

Reference Help

Abstract


Summary Misfolded proteins are usually arrested in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and degraded by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery. Several mutant alleles of PMA1, the gene coding for the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, render misfolded proteins that are retained in the ER and degraded by ERAD. A subset of misfolded PMA1 mutants exhibit a dominant negative effect on yeast growth since, when coexpressed with the wild-type allele, both proteins are retained in the ER. We have used a pma1-D378T dominant negative mutant to identify new genes involved in ERAD. A genetic screen was performed for isolation of multicopy suppressors of a GAL1-pma1-D378T allele. ATG19, a member of the cytoplasm to vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, was found to suppress the growth arrest phenotype caused by the expression of pma1-D378T. ATG19 accelerates the degradation of pma1-D378T thus allowing the co-retained wild-type Pma1 to reach the plasma membrane. ATG19 was also able to suppress other dominant lethal PMA1 mutations. The degradation of the mutant ATPase occurs in the proteasome and requires intact both ERAD and Cvt/autophagy pathways. We propose the cooperation of both pathways for an efficient degradation of misfolded Pma1.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Mazon MJ, Eraso P, Portillo F
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference