Reference: Feng ZH, et al. (1991) The yeast GLC7 gene required for glycogen accumulation encodes a type 1 protein phosphatase. J Biol Chem 266(35):23796-801

Reference Help

Abstract


The glc7 mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not accumulate glycogen due to a defect in glycogen synthase activation (Peng, Z., Trumbly, R. J., and Reimann, E.M. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 13871-13877) whereas wild-type strains accumulate glycogen as the cell cultures approach stationary phase. We isolated the GLC7 gene by complementation of the defect in glycogen accumulation and found that the GLC7 gene is the same as the DIS2S1 gene (Ohkura, H., Kinoshita, N., Miyatani, S., Toda, T., and Yanagida, M. (1989) Cell 57, 997-1007). The protein product predicted by the GLC7 DNA sequence has a sequence that is 81% identical with rabbit protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit. Protein phosphatase1 activity was greatly diminished in extracts from glc7 mutant cells. Two forms of protein phosphatase 1 were identified after chromatography of extracts on DEAE-cellulose. Both forms were diminished in the glc7 mutant and were partly restored by transformation with a plasmid carrying the GLC7 gene. Southern blots indicate the presence of a single copy of GLC7 in S. cerevisiae, and gene disruption experiments showed that the GLC7 gene is essential for cell viability. The GLC7 mRNA was identified as a 1.4-kilobase RNA that increases 4-fold at the end of exponential growth in wild-type cells, suggesting that activation of glycogen synthase is mediated by increased expression of protein phosphatase 1 as cells reach stationary phase.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Feng ZH, Wilson SE, Peng ZY, Schlender KK, Reimann EM, Trumbly RJ
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference