Reference: Lu A and Hirsch JP (2005) Cyclic AMP-independent regulation of protein kinase A substrate phosphorylation by Kelch repeat proteins. Eukaryot Cell 4(11):1794-800

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Abstract

Pseudohyphal and invasive growth in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the kelch repeat-containing proteins Gpb1p and Gpb2p, which act downstream of the G protein alpha-subunit Gpa2p. Here we show that deletion of GPB1 and GPB2 causes increased haploid invasive growth in cells containing any one of the three protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunits, suggesting that Gpb1p and Gpb2p are able to inhibit each of these kinases. Cells containing gpb1Delta gpb2Delta mutations also display increased phosphorylation of the PKA substrates Sfl1p and Msn2p, indicating that Gpb1p and Gpb2p are negative regulators of PKA substrate phosphorylation. Stimulation of PKA-dependent signaling by gpb1Delta gpb2Delta mutations occurs in cells that lack both adenylyl cyclase and the high-affinity cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterase. This effect is also seen in cells that lack the low-affinity cAMP phosphodiesterase. Given that these three enzymes control the synthesis and degradation of cAMP, these results indicate that the effect of Gpb1p and Gpb2p on PKA substrate phosphorylation does not occur by regulating the intracellular cAMP concentration. These findings suggest that Gpb1p and Gpb2p mediate their effects on the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway either by inhibiting the activity of PKA in a cAMP-independent manner or by activating phosphatases that act on PKA substrates.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Authors
Lu A, Hirsch JP
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