Reference: Teixeira D, et al. (2005) Processing bodies require RNA for assembly and contain nontranslating mRNAs. RNA 11(4):371-82

Reference Help

Abstract


Recent experiments have defined cytoplasmic foci, referred to as processing bodies (P-bodies), wherein mRNA decay factors are concentrated and where mRNA decay can occur. However, the physical nature of P-bodies, their relationship to translation, and possible roles of P-bodies in cellular responses remain unclear. We describe four properties of yeast P-bodies that indicate that P-bodies are dynamic structures that contain nontranslating mRNAs and function during cellular responses to stress. First, in vivo and in vitro analysis indicates that P-bodies are dependent on RNA for their formation. Second, the number and size of P-bodies vary in response to glucose deprivation, osmotic stress, exposure to ultraviolet light, and the stage of cell growth. Third, P-bodies vary with the status of the cellular translation machinery. Inhibition of translation initiation by mutations, or cellular stress, results in increased P-bodies. In contrast, inhibition of translation elongation, thereby trapping the mRNA in polysomes, leads to dissociation of P-bodies. Fourth, multiple translation factors and ribosomal proteins are lacking from P-bodies. These results suggest additional biological roles of P-bodies in addition to being sites of mRNA degradation.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Teixeira D, Sheth U, Valencia-Sanchez MA, Brengues M, Parker R
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference