Reference: Gu X, et al. (2005) Rapid evolution of expression and regulatory divergences after yeast gene duplication. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102(3):707-12

Reference Help

Abstract


Although gene duplication is widely believed to be the major source of genetic novelty, how the expression or regulatory network of duplicate genes evolves remains poorly understood. In this article, we propose an additive expression distance between duplicate genes, so that the evolutionary rate of expression divergence after gene duplication can be estimated through phylogenomic analysis. We have analyzed yeast genome sequences, microarrays, and transcriptional regulatory networks, showing a >10-fold increase in the initial rate for both expression and regulatory network evolution after gene duplication but only an approximately 20% rate increase in the early stage for protein sequences. Based on the estimated age distribution of yeast duplicate genes, we roughly estimate that the initial rate of expression divergence shortly after gene duplication is 2.9 x 10(-9) per year, whereas the baseline rate for very ancient gene duplication is 0.14 x 10(-9) per year. Relative expression rate tests suggest that the expression of duplicate genes tends to evolve asymmetrically, that is, the expression of one copy evolves rapidly, whereas the other one largely maintains the ancestral expression profile. Our study highlights the crucial role of early rapid evolution after gene/genome duplication for continuously increasing the complexity of the yeast regulatory network.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Gu X, Zhang Z, Huang W
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference