Take our Survey

Reference: Tan AL, et al. (2005) Essential tension and constructive destruction: the spindle checkpoint and its regulatory links with mitotic exit. Biochem J 386(Pt 1):1-13

Reference Help

Abstract

Replicated genetic material must be partitioned equally between daughter cells during cell division. The precision with which this is accomplished depends critically on the proper functioning of the mitotic spindle. The assembly, orientation and attachment of the spindle to the kinetochores are therefore constantly monitored by a surveillance mechanism termed the SCP (spindle checkpoint). In the event of malfunction, the SCP not only prevents chromosome segregation, but also inhibits subsequent mitotic events, such as cyclin destruction (mitotic exit) and cytokinesis. This concerted action helps to maintain temporal co-ordination among mitotic events. It appears that the SCP is primarily activated by either a lack of occupancy or the absence of tension at kinetochores. Once triggered, the inhibitory circuit bifurcates, where one branch restrains the sister chromatid separation by inhibiting the E3 ligase APC(Cdc20) (anaphase-promoting complex activated by Cdc20) and the other impinges on the MEN (mitotic exit network). A large body of investigations has now led to the identification of the control elements, their targets and the functional coupling among them. Here we review the emerging regulatory network and discuss the remaining gaps in our understanding of this effective mechanochemical control system.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Review | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Tan AL, Rida PC, Surana U
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference