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Reference: Anantharaman V and Aravind L (2004) The SHS2 module is a common structural theme in functionally diverse protein groups, like Rpb7p, FtsA, GyrI, and MTH1598/TM1083 superfamilies. Proteins 56(4):795-807

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Abstract


Using structural comparisons, we identified a novel domain with a simple fold in the bacterial cell division ATPase FtsA, the archaeo-eukaryotic RNA polymerase subunit Rpb7p, the GyrI superfamily, and the uncharacterized MTH1598/Tm1083-like proteins. The fold contains a core of 3 strands, forming a curved sheet, and a single helix in a strand-helix-strand-strand (SHS2) configuration. The SHS2 domain may exist either in single or duplicate copies within the same polypeptide. The single-copy versions of the domain in FtsA and Rbp7p are most closely related, and appear to mediate protein-protein interactions by means of strand 1, and the loop between strand 2 and strand 3 of the domain. We predict that the interactions between FtsA and its functional partners in bacterial cell division are likely to be similar to the interactions of Rbp7p in the archaeo-eukaryotic RNA polymerase complex. The dimeric versions typified by the GyrI superfamily appear to have been adapted for small-molecule binding. Sequence profiles searches helped us to identify several new versions of the GyrI superfamily, including a family of secreted forms that is found only in animals and the bacterial pathogen Leptospira. Through sequence-structure comparisons, we predict the positions that are likely to be important for ligand specificity in the GyrI superfamily. In the MTH1598/Tm1083-like proteins, a SHS2 domain is inserted into the loop between strand 1 and helix 1 of another SHS2 domain. This has resulted in a structure that has convergent similarities with the Hsp33 and green fluorescent protein folds. The sequence conservation pattern and its phyletic profile suggest that it might function as an enzyme in some conserved aspect of nucleic acid metabolism. Thus, the SHS2 domain is an example of a simple module that has been adapted to perform an entire spectrum of functions ranging from protein-protein interactions to small-molecule recognition and catalysis.CI - Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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Journal Article
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Anantharaman V, Aravind L
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