Reference: Clark LB, et al. (2004) Systematic mutagenesis of the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of CCR4 reveals specific sites for binding to CAF1 and a separate critical role for the LRR in CCR4 deadenylase activity. J Biol Chem 279(14):13616-23

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Abstract

CCR4, a poly(A) deadenylase of the exonuclease III family, is a component of the multiprotein CCR4-NOT complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is involved in mRNA degradation. CCR4, unlike all other exonuclease III family members, contains a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motif through which it makes contact to CAF1 and other factors. The LRR residues important in contacting CAF1 were identified by constructing 29 CCR4 mutations encompassing a majority (47 of 81) of residues interstitial to the conserved structural residues. Two-hybrid and immunoprecipitation data revealed that physical contact between CAF1 and the LRR is blocked by mutation of just two alpha-helix/beta-helix strand loop residues linking the first and second repeats. In contrast, CAF16, a potential ligand of CCR4, was abrogated in its binding to the LRR by mutations in the N terminus of the second beta-strand. The LRR domain was also found to contact the deadenylase domain of CCR4, and deletion of the LRR region completely inhibited CCR4 enzymatic activity. Mutations throughout the beta-sheet surface of the LRR, including those that did not specifically interfere with contacts to CAF1 or CAF16, significantly reduced CCR4 deadenylase activity. These results indicate that the CCR4-LRR, in addition to binding to CAF1, plays an essential role in the CCR4 deadenylation of mRNA.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Clark LB, Viswanathan P, Quigley G, Chiang YC, McMahon JS, Yao G, Chen J, Nelsbach A, Denis CL
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