Reference: Myung K, et al. (2003) Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin-assembly factors that act during DNA replication function in the maintenance of genome stability. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100(11):6640-5

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Abstract


Some spontaneous gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) seem to result from DNA-replication errors. The chromatin-assembly factor I (CAF-I) and replication-coupling assembly factor (RCAF) complexes function in chromatin assembly during DNA replication and repair and could play a role in maintaining genome stability. Inactivation of CAF-I or RCAF increased the rate of accumulating different types of GCRs including translocations and deletion of chromosome arms with associated de novo telomere addition. Inactivation of CAF-I seems to cause damage that activates the DNA-damage checkpoints, whereas inactivation of RCAF seems to cause damage that activates the DNA-damage and replication checkpoints. Both defects result in increased genome instability that is normally suppressed by these checkpoints, RAD52-dependent recombination, and PIF1-dependent inhibition of de novo telomere addition. Treatment of CAF-I- or RCAF-defective cells with methyl methanesulfonate increased the induction of GCRs compared with that seen for a wild-type strain. These results indicate that coupling of chromatin assembly to DNA replication and DNA repair is critical to maintaining genome stability.

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Myung K, Pennaneach V, Kats ES, Kolodner RD
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