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Reference: Saxena A, et al. (2002) Centromere proteins Cenpa, Cenpb, and Bub3 interact with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protein and are poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated. J Biol Chem 277(30):26921-6

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Abstract


Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is activated by DNA strand breaks during cellular genotoxic stress response and catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of acceptor proteins. These acceptor proteins include those involved in modulation of chromatin structure, DNA synthesis, DNA repair, transcription, and cell cycle control. Thus, PARP-1 is believed to play a pivotal role in maintaining genome integrity through modulation of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. We previously described the association of PARP-1 with normal mammalian centromeres and human neocentromeres by affinity purification and immunofluorescence. Here we investigated the interaction of this protein with, and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of, three constitutive centromere proteins, Cenpa, Cenpb, and Cenpc, and a spindle checkpoint protein, Bub3. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses demonstrate that Cenpa, Cenpb, and Bub3, but not Cenpc, interacted with PARP-1, and are poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated following induction of DNA damage. The results suggest a role of PARP-1 in centromere assembly/disassembly and checkpoint control. Demonstration of PARP-1-binding and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in three of the four proteins tested further suggests that many more centromere proteins may behave similarly and implicates PARP-1 as an important regulator of diverse centromere function.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Saxena A, Saffery R, Wong LH, Kalitsis P, Choo KH
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