Take our Survey

Reference: Puig S, et al. (2002) Biochemical and genetic analyses of yeast and human high affinity copper transporters suggest a conserved mechanism for copper uptake. J Biol Chem 277(29):26021-30

Reference Help

Abstract

The redox active metal copper is an essential cofactor in critical biological processes such as respiration, iron transport, oxidative stress protection, hormone production, and pigmentation. A widely conserved family of high affinity copper transport proteins (Ctr proteins) mediates copper uptake at the plasma membrane. However, little is known about Ctr protein topology, structure, and the mechanisms by which this class of transporters mediates high affinity copper uptake. In this report, we elucidate the topological orientation of the yeast Ctr1 copper transport protein. We show that a series of clustered methionine residues in the hydrophilic extracellular domain and an MXXXM motif in the second transmembrane domain are important for copper uptake but not for protein sorting and delivery to the cell surface. The conversion of these methionine residues to cysteine, by site-directed mutagenesis, strongly suggests that they coordinate to copper during the process of metal transport. Genetic evidence supports an essential role for cooperativity between monomers for the formation of an active Ctr transport complex. Together, these results support a fundamentally conserved mechanism for high affinity copper uptake through the Ctr proteins in yeast and humans.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Puig S, Lee J, Lau M, Thiele DJ
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference