Take our Survey

Reference: Murphy EC, et al. (2001) Structural basis for SRY-dependent 46-X,Y sex reversal: modulation of DNA bending by a naturally occurring point mutation. J Mol Biol 312(3):481-99

Reference Help

Abstract

The HMG-box domain of the human male sex-determining factor SRY, hSRY(HMG) (comprising residues 57-140 of the full-length sequence), binds DNA sequence-specifically in the minor groove, resulting in substantial DNA bending. The majority of point mutations resulting in 46X,Y sex reversal are located within this domain. One clinical de novo mutation, M64I in the full-length hSRY sequence, which corresponds to M9I in the present hSRY(HMG) construct, acts principally by reducing the extent of DNA bending. To elucidate the structural consequences of the M9I mutation, we have solved the 3D solution structures of wild-type and M9I hSRY(HMG) complexed to a DNA 14mer by NMR, including the use of residual dipolar couplings to derive long-range orientational information. We show that the average bend angle (derived from an ensemble of 400 simulated annealing structures for each complex) is reduced by approximately 13 degrees from 54(+/-2) degrees in the wild-type complex to 41(+/-2) degrees in the M9I complex. The difference in DNA bending can be localized directly to changes in roll and tilt angles in the ApA base-pair step involved in interactions with residue 9 and partial intercalation of Ile13. The larger bend angle in the wild-type complex arises as a direct consequence of steric repulsion of the sugar of the second adenine by the bulky S(delta) atom of Met9, whose position is fixed by a hydrogen bond with the guanidino group of Arg17. In the M9I mutant, this hydrogen bond can no longer occur, and the less bulky C(gamma)m methyl group of Ile9 braces the sugar moieties of the two adenine residues, thereby decreasing the roll and tilt angles at the ApA step by approximately 8 degrees and approximately 5 degrees, respectively, and resulting in an overall difference in bend angle of approximately 13 degrees between the two complexes. To our knowledge, this is one of the first examples where the effects of a clinical mutation involving a protein-DNA complex have been visualized at the atomic level.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Murphy EC, Zhurkin VB, Louis JM, Cornilescu G, Clore GM
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference