Reference: Dowd SR, et al. (2001) Turnover of phosphatidylcholine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The role of the CDP-choline pathway. J Biol Chem 276(6):3756-63

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Abstract


The regulation of phosphatidylcholine degradation as a function of the route of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis and changing environmental conditions has been investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the wild-type strains studied, deacylation of phosphatidylcholine to glycerophosphocholine is induced when choline is supplied to the culture medium and, also, when the culture temperature is raised from 30 to 37 degrees C. In strains bearing mutations in any of the genes encoding enzymes of the CDP-choline pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis (CKI1, choline kinase; CPT1, 1, 2-diacylglycerol choline phosphotransferase; PCT1, CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase), no induction of phosphatidylcholine turnover and glycerophosphocholine production is seen in response to choline availability or elevated temperature. In contrast, the induction of phosphatidylcholine deacylation does occur in a strain bearing mutations in genes encoding enzymes of the methylation pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis (i.e. CHO2/PEM1 and OPI3/PEM2). Whereas the synthesis of PC via CDP-choline is accelerated when shifted from 30 to 37 degrees C, synthesis of PC via the methylation pathway is largely unaffected by the temperature shift. These results suggest that the deacylation of PC to GroPC requires an active CDP-choline pathway for PC biosynthesis but not an active methylation pathway. Furthermore, the data indicate that the synthesis and turnover of CDP-choline-derived PC, but not methylation pathway-derived PC, are accelerated by the stress of elevated temperature.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Dowd SR, Bier ME, Patton-Vogt JL
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