Reference: Suter B, et al. (2000) Poly(dA.dT) sequences exist as rigid DNA structures in nucleosome-free yeast promoters in vivo. Nucleic Acids Res 28(21):4083-9

Reference Help

Abstract

Poly(dA.dT) sequences (T-tracts) are abundant genomic DNA elements with unusual properties in vitro and an established role in transcriptional regulation of yeast genes. In vitro T-tracts are rigid, contribute to DNA bending, affect assembly in nucleosomes and generate a characteristic pattern of CPDs (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) upon irradiation with UV light (UV photofootprint). In eukaryotic cells, where DNA is packaged in chromatin, the DNA structure of T-tracts is unknown. Here we have used in vivo UV photofootprinting and DNA repair by photolyase to investigate the structure and accessibility of T-tracts in yeast promoters (HIS3, URA3 and ILV1). The same characteristic photofootprints were obtained in yeast and in naked DNA, demonstrating that the unusual T-tract structure exists in living cells. Rapid repair of CPDs in the T-tracts demonstrates that these T-tracts were not folded in nucleosomes. Moreover, neither datin, a T-tract binding protein, nor Gcn5p, a histone acetyltransferase involved in nucleosome remodelling, showed an influence on the structure and accessibility of T-tracts. The data support a contribution of this unusual DNA structure to transcriptional regulation.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Suter B, Schnappauf G, Thoma F
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference