Reference: Chen X, et al. (1999) Signal peptides having standard and nonstandard cleavage sites can be processed by Imp1p of the mitochondrial inner membrane protease. J Biol Chem 274(53):37750-4

Reference Help

Abstract


We have performed a site-directed mutagenesis study showing that residues comprising the type I signal peptidase signature in the two catalytic subunits of the yeast inner membrane protease, Imp1p and Imp2p, are functionally important, consistent with the idea that these subunits contain a serine/lysine catalytic dyad. Previous studies have shown that Imp1p cleaves signal peptides having asparagine at the -1 position, which deviates from the typical signal peptide possessing a small uncharged amino acid at this position. To determine whether asparagine is responsible for the nonoverlapping substrate specificities exhibited by the inner membrane protease subunits, we have substituted asparagine with 19 amino acids in the Imp1p substrate i-cytochrome (cyt) b(2). The resulting signal peptides containing alanine, serine, cysteine, leucine, and methionine can be cleaved efficiently by Imp1p. The remaining mutant signal peptides are cleaved inefficiently or not at all. Surprisingly, none of the amino acid changes results in the recognition of i-cyt b(2) by Imp2p, whose natural substrate, i-cyt c(1), has alanine at the -1 position. The data demonstrate that (i) although the -1 residue is important in substrates recognized by Imp1p, signal peptides having standard and nonstandard cleavage sites can be processed by Imp1p, and (ii) a -1 asparagine does not govern the substrate specificity of the inner membrane protease subunits.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Chen X, Van Valkenburgh C, Fang H, Green N
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference