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Reference: Munro S and Nichols BJ (1999) The GRIP domain - a novel Golgi-targeting domain found in several coiled-coil proteins. Curr Biol 9(7):377-80

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Abstract

Many large coiled-coil proteins are being found associated peripherally with the cytoplasmic face of the organelles of the secretory pathway. Various roles have been proposed for these proteins, including the docking of donor vesicles or organelles to an acceptor organelle prior to fusion, and, in the case of the Golgi apparatus, the stacking of the cisternae [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]. Such critical roles require accurate recruitment to the correct organelle. For the endosomal coiled-coil protein EEA1, targeting requires a carboxy-terminal FYVE domain, which interacts with Rab5 and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P), whereas the Golgi protein GM130 interacts with Golgi membranes via the protein GRASP65 [3] [6] [7]. In this paper, we show that two other mammalian Golgi coiled-coil proteins, golgin-245/p230 and golgin-97, have a conserved domain of about 50 amino acids at their carboxyl termini. This 'GRIP' domain is also found at the carboxyl terminus of several other large coiled-coiled proteins of unknown function, including two human proteins and proteins in the genomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and yeasts. The GRIP domains from several of these proteins, including that from the yeast protein Imh1p, were sufficient to specify Golgi targeting in mammalian cells when fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). This result suggests that this small domain functions to recruit specific coiled-coil proteins to the Golgi by recognising a determinant that has been well conserved in eukaryotic evolution.

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Journal Article
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Munro S, Nichols BJ
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