About SGD

The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms.

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New & Noteworthy

  • That Sweet Spot of Mistranslation

    08/03/2017

    Anyone at a party knows that a little alcohol can make you charming, but a lot can doom any relationship from blossoming (just listen to Drunk Uncle!). In fact, too much can destroy a party! You need to have enough alcohol to curb social inhibitions, but not so much you overwhelm them. According to a new study out in GENETICS by Berg and coworkers, something similar sometimes seems to be true when the genetic code evolves.... Read...
  • Now Yeast Even Finds Fungal Pathogens!

    07/27/2017

    Some products have lots and lots of uses. Sometimes they are designed that way like the hypothetical Shimmer, a floor wax and dessert topping from Saturday Night Live. And sometimes they can be used in more situations than they were originally designed for like Windex in the movie My Big Fat Greek Wedding, or the most versatile thing out there in real life, duct tape. (Click here and here for some fun duct tape uses). Wait,... Read...
  • Call for Yeast Genetics Meeting 2018 Award Nominations!

    07/25/2017

    The Yeast Genetics Meeting will be held August 22-26, 2018 at Stanford University. You are invited to submit nominations to the meeting organizers for the awards and presentations that have become a cornerstone of the meeting. The Lifetime Achievement Award is given for lifetime contributions in the field of yeast genetics and outstanding community service. The Ira Herskowitz Award is given for outstanding contributions in the field of yeast research in the last 20 years. This award is... Read...
  • Make Some More Room for Lamarck

    07/17/2017

    For most people, a move to Tibet or other high altitude places is a real struggle. They suffer the many nasty symptoms of high altitude sickness while they are there. Some people though, like natives of Tibet or of the Andes, have adapted to the extreme altitudes through natural selection and do just fine. How they adapted is a typical Darwinian story. Those who happened to have the right set of DNA did better than those who... Read...

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